I can’t really comment much on Connie, because I don’t really want to influence too much how everyone perceives her. I’d like to say, “Hey, this character is obviously straight-up evil!” and leave it there, but the reality of a good character vs an evil character is a lot more grey than black and white.

Anyway, here’s a bunch of stuff on one page you can all ponder until next week! Aubrey’s efforts will have to ramp up if she wants to protect her pack. A fun trick emotional abusers like to use is withholding information that should have really been dispensed in a much more timely manner in order to make you feel crazy! It’s like trying to talk to a fun house mirror – you think reality as you know it is one way, but you’re told it’s totally different until you can’t do anything but doubt yourself. Fun!

Artwise, it’s nice to finally settle into drawing a character. I feel like I’m finally hitting my stride in the last two chapters where everyone looks like what I wanted them to look like from the beginning. I’m drawn Malaya so many times at this point that she’s usually the easiest character to tackle, but every time I introduce a new character, there’s a weird settling-in period where I have to work out the little things about drawing them. I’m glad I did this comic, no matter where it ends up, because there are so many things I’ve had to work out in my own art style that have made my skills a lot more solid and really fleshed out my understanding of things I thought I had figured out. Especially placement of facial features! I can’t believe it took me 30 years to figure out where to put the nose, but now I know.

The background for this scene was fun to layout. I ended up creating a really basic layout in Google SketchUp so I could get the counters the correct height compared to the characters, and it super helped. Perspective isn’t too hard until you’re sitting there trying to figure out why all your people look too small or too huge. I wanted a very classic, maybe early 50s/late 40s kitchen. You can’t really see the stove on the left, but it’s based on a Chambers stove, which are super bad ass and I want one. They were these mammoth, very heavy beasts produced in the 50s that came in sweet ass colors and you could cook without the gas on! (There’s even one that’s mostly copper and stainless steel and it’s fucking gorgeous.) I guess the idea was you would preheat the oven using the gas, then based on the chart they provided, you would turn the gas off once it reached the correct heat (because nothing dinged to tell you it was preheated, naturally), and then it would maintain that temperature for the duration of the thing you were cooking. I have no idea. I know the stoves were so heavy because they were insulated like a motherfucker, though. I want one. It would probably make me tear my hair out to figure out how to use it, but I want one.